All posts by Elizabeth

Teton Habitat Awarded Major Funding for The Grove Phase III From FHLB through Bank of Jackson Hole

A $200,000 Competitive Affordable Housing Program (AHP) grant from the Bank of Jackson Hole and the Federal Home Loan Bank of Des Moines (FHLB Des Moines) will help fund the $8 Million affordable housing development at The Grove Phase III, a 24-unit condo-home development in the town of Jackson, WY.

The grant was awarded to Habitat for Humanity of the Greater Teton Area (Teton Habitat), a local non-profit organization that is spearheading the project. This grant is the first ever AHP grant awarded in Teton County.

“The homes we’re building at The Grove will positively impact the long term quality of life for 24 local families,” said Teton Habitat Executive Director Kendra Heimbuck. “Being awarded this grant underscores the great value of affordable housing in our community and the high caliber of Teton Habitat’s project execution in comparison to affordable housing developments across the nation.”

The first 8 units at The Grove Phase III, behind the County Library in Jackson were finished last fall. The 8 units in the second stage supported by this AHP grant will be completed in early 2020 with the entire 24 unit construction project slated to wrap up in the summer of 2021.

“The Bank of Jackson Hole is proud to facilitate projects that help our community,” said Bank of Jackson Hole’s President, Jim Ryan. “Through this partnership with FHLB Des Moines, we are able to support a great cooperative project making the dream of affordable living for some working families a reality.”

Funds for this program were provided through the Federal Home Loan Bank of Des Moines Competitive Affordable Housing Program.

About Habitat for Humanity of the Greater Teton Area

Habitat builds affordable homes in partnership with hardworking families in the Greater Teton Area and strengthens families and neighborhoods through community education and volunteer engagement.  With the proud support of one of the area’s most passionate donor communities, homes are built and sold at no profit to pre-selected partner families and individuals through an interest-free loan to ensure affordable monthly payments.  Homeowners also contribute at least 500 hours of sweat equity, save for closing costs, and take a series of homeowner education classes to qualify as Habitat Homeowner partners.  Habitat also runs the Habitat for Humanity ReStore, which sells donated home furnishings, appliances and building supplies to help fund Habitat’s program.
For more information: www.tetonhabitat.org/ or 307-734-0828 or visit the Habitat for Humanity ReStore

Building strength, stability, and self-reliance!
Habitat for Humanity of the Greater Teton Area (Teton Habitat)
kendra@tetonhabitat.org | 307-734-0828
850 W. Broadway | P.O.Box 4194
Jackson Hole, WY 83001
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tetonhabitat/
ReStore Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tetonhabitatrestore/
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/teton_habitat/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/TetonHabitat

Welcome to the Team!

Wendy Martinez joins the Habitat team as Homeowner Services Manager

Wendy was raised in Jackson and has lived in the area for 26 years. She attended the University of Wyoming receiving a B.S. Degree in Political Science and a Master’s Degree in Public Administration and Public Policy. As a long time community member, Wendy wanted to pursue a career opportunity that would allow her to apply her expertise towards helping her community resolve some of the most pressing issues.

As the Homeowner Services Manager, she is responsible for overseeing a range of services for our current and future homeowners. In addition, she responds to housing inquiries and conducts information sessions for the public. Her favorite aspect of Habitat is that the organization’s impact goes beyond building affordable housing for the Greater Teton Area.

When she is not working, Wendy loves playing soccer, running, and hanging out with friends! Contact Wendy at wendy@tetonhabitat.org or at 307-734-0389 ext. 104

Building strength, stability, and self-reliance!
Habitat for Humanity of the Greater Teton Area (Teton Habitat)
wendy@tetonhabitat.org | 307-734-0828
850 W. Broadway | P.O.Box 4194
Jackson Hole, WY 83001
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tetonhabitat/
ReStore Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tetonhabitatrestore/
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/teton_habitat/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/TetonHabitat

Teton Habitat launches Winter Warrior Challenge

Habitat for Humanity of the Greater Teton Area (Teton Habitat) is challenging community members to participate in our 2nd Annual Winter Warrior Challenge. Teton Habitat is launching the volunteering competition on January 8th. The competition will run until March 31st. Each hour spent volunteering earns participants a point in the challenge. The three volunteers with the highest number of points on April 1st receive prizes for first, second and third place. The prizes include an evening stay and a round of golf for two at Big Sky Resort, a dinner for two at any Fine Dining Restaurant, and a $100.00 gift certificate to Jackson Hole Buffalo Meat Company.

Habitat builds year round and is in need of support during the winter months the most. It is critical to continue to have volunteers active on the site in order to hit our project deadline. The Winter Warrior Challenge aims to increase volunteer participation during the chilly months. “Lending a hand at the jobsite during the winter is super educational and very rewarding.” says Outreach Coordinator, Elizabeth Ferguson. “Volunteers have the opportunity to work alongside our construction team and homeowners.” Individuals and groups are invited to participate in the Winter Warrior Challenge.

Volunteers are welcome to build with Teton Habitat at The Grove, 845 W. Snow King Ave, any Wednesday, Thursday and Saturday from 9-4:30 PM. Interested volunteers should sign up online at www.tetonhabitat.org/get-involved. Please make sure you always dress appropriately when you come to volunteer with Habitat, especially during the winter months. This winter, volunteer tasks include, but are not limited to, interior finishes, flooring, installing cabinets and framing.

About Habitat for Humanity of the Greater Teton Area

Habitat builds homes in partnership with hardworking families in the Greater Teton Area and helps build stronger families and neighborhoods through homeowner education and by partnering with donors and volunteers to construct attractive affordable homes.  Homes are sold at no profit to pre-selected partner families and individuals with an interest-free loan to ensure affordable monthly payments.  Homeowners are required to contribute at least 500 hours of “sweat equity”, save for closing costs, and take a series of homeowner education classes in order to purchase the home.  Habitat also runs the Habitat for Humanity ReStore, which sells donated building supplies, home furnishings and appliances to help fund Habitat’s program.

For more information, please call 307-734-0828, visit the Habitat for Humanity ReStore, or visit us on the web at www.tetonhabitat.org.

Building strength, stability, and self-reliance!
Habitat for Humanity of the Greater Teton Area (Teton Habitat)
elizabeth@tetonhabitat.org | 307-734-0828
850 W. Broadway | P.O.Box 4194
Jackson Hole, WY 83001
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tetonhabitat/
ReStore Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tetonhabitatrestore/
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/teton_habitat/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/TetonHabitat

GAF supports Teton Habitat project through Community Contractor Program

Habitat for Humanity of the Greater Teton Area is grateful to have received a generous donation of roofing materials from the GAF Corporation for the first homes at The Grove, Phase III in Jackson WY, completed in October 2018.

GAF Corp and Habitat for Humanity International developed the Community Contractor Program to facilitate support for the construction efforts of local Habitat affiliates. Roof Top Solutions from Idaho Falls, a GAF-certified installer agreed to contribute all the labor necessary for installation. The net value of the donation was $22,995.

“In-kind donations help us to keep our building costs down and to serve more households in our community.  We are so pleased with the newly developed partnership with GAF Corp.” Says Kendra Heimbuck, Teton Habitat’s Executive Director.

Habitat is currently under construction of twenty-four homes in Phase III of The Grove. The first eight units were sold to homeowner’s in mid-October.  The next eight homes are set for completion in February 2020. Volunteers are welcome on the Habitat jobsite every Wednesday, Thursday and Saturday from 9-4:30. Sign up online at tetonhabitat.org/get-involved/construction-site-volunteer/

Building strength, stability, and self-reliance!
Habitat for Humanity of the Greater Teton Area (Teton Habitat)
kendra@tetonhabitat.org | 307-734-0828
850 W. Broadway | P.O.Box 4194
Jackson Hole, WY 83001
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tetonhabitat/
ReStore Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tetonhabitatrestore/
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/teton_habitat/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/TetonHabitat

Holiday Poinsettia Drive Is On Now – While Supplies Last!

Teton Habitat’s popular annual Poinsettia Sale is underway!

Click here to order

Order early to reserve the best Poinsettia’s in town to add some holiday cheer to your home or office!  Both red and white plants in 6.5” pots are available. Plants are $16 each allowing for $12 to go directly to our projects.

FREE DELIVERY for orders of 15 or more.

Questions? Contact: Paul Schmidt, Teton Habitat Development Officer, paul@tetonhabitat.org or 307-734-0828 x 101.

Grove Home Dedication

After 16 months of helping hands, dedicated families, and countless successes– It is time to dedicate the first 8 homes at the Grove.

In June 2017, Teton Habitat broke ground on the first 8 of 24 homes at The Grove. Our future Grove homeowner’s have contributed over 2300 hours and engaged over 300 friends, family and community member to help build their homes.

Completion of the first 8 homes could not have been accomplished without the help of our volunteers, supporters, community partners, staff and board. Thank you!

Join us to celebrate the dedication of these homes Thursday, October 18th at 4:30 PM. Refreshments and home tours will follow a brief ceremony.

Habitat Pilots Zero Waste Construction Site

Teton County’s first model of a zero waste construction site, a partnership between Integrated Solid Waste and Recycling (ISWR) and Greater Teton Habitat for Humanity, was successful in diverting  25,737 pounds of material from the landfill, a 45% diversion rate for the overall project. The process to achieve this level of resource recovery and careful project management was both exciting and challenging! The impacts of this significant effort were shared with 14 staff members, 1131 volunteers, 55 subcontractors, and a lunch-and-learn event audience of 31. The experience turned out to be everything we hoped, a little we didn’t expect, and a lot we can all use going forward.

Results:

As shown in the table below, the year-end results from zero waste efforts at the Grove resulted in the diversion of 25,737 pounds of material from the landfill, a diversion rate of 45%. As discussed in the initial grant application, this diversion rate may now function as a baseline comparison for future zero waste construction projects.

Material Pounds to Landfill Pounds Diverted

from Landfill

Total Pounds Generated % Diversion from Landfill
Trash 32,000
Metal 2,000
Wood 20,000
Glass 36
Aluminum Cans 290
Plastic Bottles 211
Corrugated Cardboard 3,200
Total 32,000 25,737 57,737 45%

 

As anticipated, the 2017-2018 Zero Waste Model Construction Site was successful in  demonstrating what a zero waste construction site could look like, how it could be managed, what it could achieve in the way of diverting materials from the landfill, and how it might influence the standard practices of staff, volunteers, subcontractors, waste haulers, and local industry professionals.

With support from ISWR, Teton Habitat staff did an excellent job of identifying the materials that would be targeted for diversion. These categories included wood, metal, cardboard, and lunch area recyclables (as pictured). The Habitat team planned the spatial arrangement of multiple material bins and coordinated the collection and hauling of each of the materials.

Once the systems to collect materials were in place, Habitat organizers developed and implemented appropriate signage and training to educate site participants on how to utilize the zero waste systems and processes. This included a daily training for volunteers on how to properly dispose of recyclable and non-recyclable materials. The photo below depicts one of the instructional signs.

A Lunch-and-Learn event, hosted by ISWR with the support of the Community Foundation, was held in November 2017 to share the results of the first five months of testing zero waste operations at the Grove. Teton Habitat Outreach Coordinator, Elizabeth Ferguson, along with additional Habitat staff members, described the process to separate and divert construction materials, train volunteers and subcontractors, and track progress. The event audience totaled 31 people and included representatives from the design and construction industry, the waste hauling industry, and several sustainability related organizations.

A number of event attendees expressed interest in continuing the conversation and remaining involved in the effort to increase waste diversion within the construction and demolition industry. A focus group was created from these individuals and has continued to meet quarterly since the initial November event. The group is currently managed as a committee of the ISWR advisory board and includes sixteen members.  Initiatives underway include:

  • the addition of ISWR waste diversion guidelines to the information provided by these designers, project managers and haulers to their customers;
  • an expansion of material bin sizes, locking tops, and collection services provided by local hauling companies – to accommodate the variable needs of different sizes and types of construction sites and projects;
  • plans to draft a zero waste construction site manual for project managers that will include many of the practices and lessons from the Grove and other demonstration sites;
  • the selection of additional/future zero waste demonstration sites in the region; and
  • possible collaboration with the TRUE program, a new resource and certification program from the US Green Building Council, http://newsroom.usgbc.org/gbci-introduces-true-zero-waste-rating-system/ 

Lessons

Many thanks to the Teton Habitat staff for opening their site and themselves up to the many lessons learned throughout this initial year of zero waste demonstration. They were diligent in tracking results , noting observations and, when things did not go as planned, “diving” in to clean up anything that went awry. The following is a summary of the lessons they recorded:

  • Bin Sizes – Initially, the bin sizes available from local waste haulers were limited. They offered only large roll-off dumpsters, which took up a large amount of space on the site and assumed that equal amounts of wood, metal, etc. would be generated. Habitat coordinators originally ordered three 16 foot roll-offs; one each for metal, wood and landfill bound trash. Once it was understood that the footprint of these dumpsters was oversized and unnecessary, an adjustment was made to use one 16 foot roll-off for wood, a 4-yd bin for landfill bound trash, and a self-crafted metal bin.
    • This discussion at the lunch-and-learn event resulted in the subsequent expansion of bin sizes available from several local waste haulers for construction materials.
  • Metal Hauling – The amount of metal collected from the site was less than expected. The large metal dumpster and planned haul trips turned out to be unnecessary. Habitat staff, instead, fashioned a small box for metal recycling and hauled this material to recycling on their own as necessary. The financial impacts of this change are noted in the budget section below.
    • In new construction, there is less metal recycling to be done than on a demolition project.
  • Daily Training – The Habitat volunteer model, which includes a daily safety talk, allowed for a short daily recycling and waste diversion training session for any new people on site. On a traditional, non-volunteer construction site, recycling training would need to take place any time a new construction member or subcontractor participates on site.
  • Recycling Lunch/Personal Items – For the first stage of this particular project, Habitat subcontracted the framing out to a local construction crew. This allowed for the observation of a typical construction crew in comparison with those participating in the Habitat volunteer model. It was noted that the subcontracted crews struggled more with recycling lunch/personal items (water bottles, cans, and glass) than they did with the construction materials, such as wood, metals, and cardboard. These crews were more familiar with sorting construction items than the personal use items, so special steps were taken to increase signage and awareness around the lunch/break area.
    • Habitat coordinators noted a potential opportunity to include the elements of zero waste operations within all coordinating project contracts (subcontractors, etc.) but were not able to implement them within the timeframe of this project.
  • Magnetic Signs for Roll-off Bins – Habitat coordinators opted for magnetic signs to attach to the roll-off bins to be easily interchangeable when a full bin was removed and an empty one was delivered. These signs were substantially delayed at the beginning of the project but were eventually found to be useful.
  • Upstairs Recycling – Smaller, 50-gallon trash cans, were used for crews working on the second-floor spaces to sort their materials nearby and then deliver the pre-sorted items to the larger bins on the ground. This method was found to be more effective than having the crews combine materials upstairs and handle them again in order to sort them into the larger bins.
  • Contamination – Despite ample training and appropriate signage, contamination is an issue in all efforts to collect recyclables. Not all materials are sorted and deposited into the correct bins. The photo below is of Habitat Outreach Coordinator, Elizabeth Ferguson, following her triumphant removal of pounds and pounds of unwanted trash from the WOOD ONLY container. Contamination from trash in wood disposal loads is a common occurrence and results in a sorting fee of $250/ton at the Teton County Trash Transfer Station.
  • Plastic-coated Wood Wrap – The largest contributor, by volume, to the landfill-bound trash bins was the plastic-coated wrap used for the bunks of wood from the lumber yard. Although this material is light, it is very bulky and quickly filled the trash dumpsters, requiring more frequent emptying. ISWR was unable to identify a recycling opportunity for this plastic wrap but will continue to monitor markets.
  • Stretchy Plastic Film – The collection of recyclable stretchy plastic film also proved difficult. None of the waste haulers offered any type of bin or collection service for this material, so ISWR provide a large roll-off container (similar to the large blue bins used at community recycling sites) for collection during the late spring and early summer months. It tends to be that the longer an unlocked bin sits on a public site, the higher the chances are that it will be filled with trash. Unfortunately, this was the case with the bin supplied for plastic film. When it was finally emptied onto the recycling floor, it was found to be completely contaminated with food waste and the accompanying mold and maggots. This load, consisting of 2300 pounds of plastic and trash, had to be sent to the landfill rather than recycled. A smaller bin with more regular tipping service is recommended for plastic film collection in the future.

Project Continuation

Teton Habitat intends to continue to operate the Grove as a zero waste model site. ISWR plans to provide support through additional/improved signage, outreach and social media promotion, and collaboration via the zero waste construction focus group mentioned above.

Budget

The total expenses for this project turned out to be less than anticipated. The changes to the plans for scrap metal collection and hauling described in the Results section above resulted in expenses that totaled 26% less than originally anticipated, a surplus of $1102. Following a conversation and subsequent approval from staff at the Community Foundation of Jackson Hole, these funds will be utilized in related areas of ISWR zero waste outreach. The additional funds will be used for updated brochures explaining construction material disposal guidelines, additional cardboard recycling services at the Grove, and reusable banners and signage for continued zero waste operations at the Grove as well as future demonstration sites.

Building strength, stability, and self-reliance!
Habitat for Humanity of the Greater Teton Area (Teton Habitat)
kendra@tetonhabitat.org | 307-734-0828
850 W. Broadway | P.O.Box 4194
Jackson Hole, WY 83001
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tetonhabitat/
ReStore Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tetonhabitatrestore/
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/teton_habitat/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/TetonHabitat

Wayfair joins Teton Habitat to support Phase III of The Grove

Wayfair donates all the bathroom fixtures to homeowners at The Grove, Phase III.

Habitat for Humanity of the Greater Teton Area (Teton Habitat) and Wayfair, one of the world’s largest online destinations for the home, are collaborating to support the development of Phase III of The Grove, a multi-family condominium complex that will provide housing to an estimated 32 adults and 54 children.  Residents at The Grove will benefit from Wayfair’s vast renovation product selection and receive donated fixtures such as bathroom vanities, countertops, mirrors, toilets, and towel racks. In addition, residents also received sink and shower fixtures from Kohler.

“Since 2012, Wayfair has partnered with Habitat for Humanity International, our headquarters, as well as local affiliates across the nation. We were very eager to build a direct relationship and help promote their versatile contractor services in Jackson,” says Kendra Heimbuck, Teton Habitat’s Executive Director.

The donated fixtures are currently being installed in eight homes, the first to be ready for residents at The Grove. Future homeowners were overjoyed to unwrap the bathroom vanity packages from Wayfair during a recent Saturday build day.

“It’s so beautiful!” exclaimed Nicolle Moyer, future Habitat Homeowner “I can’t believe this is going into my house.”

Habitat is currently under construction with 16 of the 24 units in Phase III of The Grove. The first eight units are expected to be finished in late September.

“We’re proud to support such an important project in the Jackson Hole community by working with Habitat for Humanity of the Greater Teton Area to provide needed bathroom fixtures for the homeowners at The Grove,” said Jane Carpenter, Head of Corporate Social Responsibility at Wayfair. “Habitat for Humanity’s critical work in local communities supports our core mission to help people live in a comfortable home that they love.”

About Habitat for Humanity of the Greater Teton Area

Habitat builds affordable homes in partnership with hardworking families in the Greater Teton Area and strengthens families and neighborhoods through community education and volunteer engagement.  With the proud support of one of the area’s most passionate donor communities, homes are built and sold at no profit to pre-selected partner families and individuals through an interest-free loan to ensure affordable monthly payments.  Homeowners also contribute at least 500 hours of sweat equity, save for closing costs, and take a series of homeowner education classes to qualify as Habitat Homeowner partners.  Habitat also runs the Habitat for Humanity ReStore, which sells donated home furnishings, appliances and building supplies to help fund Habitat’s program.
For more information: www.tetonhabitat.org/ or 307-734-0828 or visit the Habitat for Humanity ReStore

Building strength, stability, and self-reliance!
Habitat for Humanity of the Greater Teton Area (Teton Habitat)
kendra@tetonhabitat.org | 307-734-0828
850 W. Broadway | P.O.Box 4194
Jackson Hole, WY 83001
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tetonhabitat/
ReStore Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tetonhabitatrestore/
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/teton_habitat/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/TetonHabitat